Tibetan Monks-Sand Mandala, Closing

Yesterday was the final day of the Tibetan Monks visit to Penn State Berks Campus.

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After three days of construction, the Mandal was breathtaking.

The destruction of something so beautiful and painstakingly created is hard to watch.  The Ritualistic demolition ceremony is lovely and melancholy.

The monks conclude their creation of the mandala with a consecration ceremony.

The Beginning of the Closing Ceremony (Video Here)

During the closing ceremony, the monks dismantle the mandala, sweeping up the colored sands to symbolize the impermanence of all that exists. When requested, half of the sand is distributed to the audience as blessings for personal health and healing.

 

 

The remaining sand is carried in a procession by the monks, accompanied by guests, to a flowing body of water, where it is ceremonially poured to disperse the healing energies of the mandala throughout the world.

Amazing Chanting (Video 2 – 4:16)

Chanting (video 3 1:02)

 

 


Instruments and Chanting

(video 4 0:59)

 


Flower Drop

(Video 5 0:33)

 


Mandala Destruction (video 6 1:39)

Mandala Destruction (video 7 1:27)

 

Channel 69 News Story Here:
Art Made, Destroyed At Penn State Berks

Reading Eagle Story Here
Striking, and spiritual, images in sand

See Monk and Mandala Post Here

Mystic Art of Tibet Pose Here

Learn More about Mandalas Here

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