Posts Tagged ‘yamas’

YAMS & The Get Some Show Made the Reading Eagle

March 9, 2010

Check it out on the web:
http://readingeagle.com/article.aspx?id=203290

or on the Front Page of Section E….LIFE

YAMS & the "Get Some" Show

Kate & Jesi

Spring Township, PA – If you don’t click on the wrong channel or incorrectly type a Web site into your computer when you are trying to find a show produced by Penn State Berks WPSB-TV, you could “Get Some.”

Get what?

Related Articles
How to watch

About Alice Holland

Types of programming
[+] Enlarge. (2 pictures)

Lauren A. Little
Kate L. Donehower, a sophomore from Lansdale, Montgomery County, during a taping of the “Get Some” TV program at Penn State Berks.
A show with health information.

Is the show about what you suspect it’s about?

Yep.

How’s it spelled.

S-E-X.

What’s it mean?

Enlightenment and sexual health.

Three cheers for that.

In its second year, “Get Some” is the collaborative brainchild of Alice R. Holland, a certified nurse practitioner and supervisor of the Health Services Department at Penn State Berks, Spring Township, and several journalism and broadcasting students.

Holland also teaches courses in health and human sexuality and is a human sexuality doctoral student.

“I wanted to find a creative way to get across information on a variety of health topics,” Holland said, adding that she hosts “Get Some,” a campus television show aimed at college-aged adults to encourage learning about human sexuality and health.

The show is filmed monthly before a live interactive student audience at the Perkins Student Center.

This year, “Get Some” has already tackled such topics as yoga for sexual health and using meditation to assist with moods and relationships. Another program was dedicated to giving students tips to have a safe spring break, especially in locations far from home or abroad.

For most shows, expert guests are interviewed or answer student questions, and creative techniques also are encouraged to make a program more fun or interactive.

For example, in the program emphasizing safety on spring breaks, a multicolored beach ball was tossed around the audience.

When students caught it, their fingers touched certain colored sections of the ball, each section overlayed with written topics that could be addressed.

Among the health-oriented topics were avoiding alcohol or drug abuse, indulging in safe sex, being wary of pickpockets, securing personal property from theft, keeping the body hydrated, using sunscreen and being knowledgeable and respectful of one’s surroundings.

In addition, students were made aware of the advantages of establishing a buddy system, not undertaking an activity that could easily lead to injury and being aware of native foods and water that may cause digestive upset.

“Young people are inclined to have fun, but we stressed using common sense in that program,” Holland said. “If something doesn’t look or feel safe, students should avoid it.”

Part of spring-break program was to encourage students to take “The Safe Spring Challenge” with a “Not Tonight” theme. It offered students prizes and credit for attending a workshop if they gave up alcohol or tobacco and asked them to submit their stories and photos to Holland.

“It (‘Get Some’) is a cool show that engages students and gives them a comfortable format to tackle some sensitive topics,” said Nate Lee, 20, Palymra, Lebanon County, current WPSB-TV (Channel 5) club president, studying broadcast journalism.

“Students also are having fun while learning,” said Iman McDonnaugh, 18, Freeport, N.Y., a freshman studying communications who also served as a co-host of the spring-break program.

Holland said Dale Lefever, past president of WPSB-TV and a Penn State Berks 2009 graduate with a degree in information science and technology, was instrumental in getting the program started.

Jeff Fazio, assistant director of student affairs at Penn State Schuylkill, who formerly worked at the Berks campus, also assisted with the show’s logo design, Holland said.

“Each embraced my concept of pairing my health background with expertise in broadcasting,” she said.

Megan O’Malley, Sinking Spring, a part-time faculty member teaching a yoga class on campus, was joined by Jesi Yost, Shillington, a yoga instructor, for another “Get Some” program.

They demonstrated yoga positions designed to increase student awareness of their bodies, improve flexibility and spark human connections with others.

“Yoga is not just about stretching and breathing exercises,” O’Malley said. “It is a physical, emotional and spiritual practice that provides guidelines for behavior.

“It’s about making a connection, but it also helps in opening yourself up when it comes to building a relationship and sharing intimacy with your partner.”

She made students aware of a variety of poses, some of them outlined in an article on partner yoga that teaches couples how to deepen trust and enhance intimacy.

O’Malley debunked any student belief that yoga is only for women, noting the greatest yoga masters in Hindu culture are men. She said women were once even forbidden to practice it.

O’Malley responded to a blunt and somewhat sexist query: “Do you think men prefer their girlfriends to be familiar with yoga when it comes to bedroom activities?”

“I think women prefer men who do yoga,” she said. “Yoga is not just a woman thing. This is a practice that has mutual benefits for both sexes.”

Aparigraha: Non-attachment, Non-possessiveness

November 8, 2009

Aparigraha- limit possessions to what is necessary or important.  Take only what is necessary. Do not to take advantage of a situation or act greedy. Only take what is earned; if we take more, we are exploiting someone else. Aparigraha also implies letting go of our attachments to things and an understanding that impermanence and change are the only constants.  We can enjoy and use luxuries in our lives, but Aparigraha teaches us to let go of things at a moment’s notice.

Things you can try to practice Aparigraha

Give something away

Let go of an idea or belief that inhibits your capacity to discover new ideas and experiences.

Prioritize how your time and energy is spent

Streamline and simplify one thing in your life

Affirmation for Aparigraha

I let go of collection possessions

I let go of clinging to people

I keep only what I need

My life is simple and streamlined

I am contented with little, attached to nothing

Journal Writing Exercises:

What times have you let go of attachments and were rewarded?

When have you manifested exactly what you needed?

What does it mean to possess something?

What does it mean to need something?

What are some of the objects, ideas, and beliefs that you possess?

Are there any possessions that you are particularly attached to?  What and why?

Yoga Posture for Aparigraha: Ardha Mandalasana or half circle posture.

From this posture, you can let go of your attachments through your outstretched arm.

See all the 8 Limbs of Yoga Posts HERE

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Bramacharya- moderation in all things

October 26, 2009

Bramacharya- moderation in all things.  Refraining from allowing one activity overtake your whole life. The word is often used to refer to celibacy or denying pleasure, but this is only a small part of what Brahmacharya represents. The purpose of Bramachary is to keep you focused on your purpose in life, the things that instill a feeling of peace and contentment in you.  Brahmacharya can also mean conserving your life force.

Things you can try to practice Bramacharya

Don’t push yourself in yoga practice

Don’t overindulge in food

Try to control addictions

Try to be mindful and develop strength

Affirmation for Bramacharya

I am a spiritual being

I am moderate in my appetite

I am in perfect harmony and balance

I use my energy in divine service


Journal Writing Exercises:

How can you practice moderation in your everyday life?

In what ways are you excessive in mind, speech or body?

Examine a typical day in your life.

How do you use your energy?

How much time do you send on work, school, sleep, meditation, friends and family.

Is there any thing you would like to change?

Yoga Posture for Brahmacharya: Janu Shirshasana or head to knee posture

In this posture, you might go to a moderate expression of the posture instead of forcing the posture to have your head totally on your knee.

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Asteya: Non-stealing

October 26, 2009

Asteya: Non-stealing

Steya means “to steal”; Asteya is the opposite– take nothing that does not belong to us.

This is not exactly the same as “Thou Shalt Not Steal.” It also has aspects of “Thou shall not covet.” If someone entrusts something to us or confides in us, we do not take advantage of him. Non-stealing includes not only taking what belongs to another without permission, but also using something for a different purpose to that intended. The practice of asteya implies not taking anything that has not been freely given.

Things you can try to practice Asteya

Be considerate when demanding another’s attention and time

Don’t want what someone else owns

Don’t compare and want what others have in physical ability, beauty, youth, material wealth, fame, power or love.

Ask yourself if you truly need what it is that you want

Affirmation for Asteya

I respect people’s ideas and accomplishments

I honor what belongs to others

I am satisfied with what I have

I appreciate my abundance

I am whole and complete

I am at peace with myself

Journal Writing Exercises:

Write 3 ways that you are blessed

Is there anyone whose possessions or accomplishments you covet?

What makes you feel jealous or envious?

What have you misused that belongs to others?

Yoga Posture for Asteya -Natrajasana or the Dancer Posture.

This is a posture of that looks lovely when it is done well, but it is difficult to get to that place. When you see someone doing this posture, it takes asteya to not want what someone else can do.

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Satya: truth in word, thought, and deed

October 12, 2009

Satya: truth in word, thought, and deed

Commitment to Truthfulness – “To speak the truth” Satya is is perfect truthfulness in thought, word and deed, however if speaking the truth has negative consequences for another, then it is better to say nothing. Satya should never come into conflict with our efforts to behave with ahimsa.  With others we need to have the courage to speak and listen to what is true in a loving way.  Satya entails living in harmony and integrity with all that is.

Things you can try to practice Satya

Observe “what is” rather than “what we wish was”

Ask before speaking: “Is it true? Is it necessary? Is it nonharming?”

Restrain from using sarcasm

Do not gossip

Observing truths and non-truths around you in social, professional, familial, and casual relationships

Observe moments when you feel most tempted to exaggerate, justify, or otherwise step away from your Truth

Affirmation for Satya

I am clear about who I am

I speak my truth appropriately

I listen and respect the truth of others

I am always true to myself

Journal Writing Exercises:

In what ways are your actions inconsistent with your speech?

What situations/relationships are you not true to yourself?

Who are you untruthful to and why?

Yoga Posture for Satya -Virabhadrasana 1 or Warrior 1 Posture.

This is a posture of standing forward and being forward in your truth.

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Yamas-Restraints, Ahimsa: nonviolence, non-harming

October 5, 2009

Ahimsa: nonviolence, non-harming

Compassion for all living things
The word ahimsa means not to injure or show cruelty to any creature or any person (including ourselves) in any way whatsoever. Ahimsa is, more than just lack of violence as adapted in yoga. It means kindness, friendliness, and thoughtful consideration of other people and things. It also has to do with our duties and responsibilities too. Ahimsa implies that in every situation we should adopt a considerate attitude and do no harm.

We all commit small acts of violence every day.  We carelessly harm each other, the earth, and ourselves in dozens of different ways, because we are not living our lives in compassion and awareness.

Did you have an argument with someone?

It is better to be kind than right

Did you forget to recycle that glass bottle or your junk mail?

During your Yoga practice, did you force your body to stretch farther than you knew it should?

If you can’t breath freely, you shouldn’t be there

Things you can try to practice Ahimsa

Practice forgiveness, compromise and reconciliation

Try vegetarianism for a meal, day, week, or a lifetime.

If living meat free doesn’t appeal to you try giving thanks before each meal for the life that has been given.

Carry an insect outside instead of stepping on it

If you are sleepy go to bed.  If you are sick stay home.

Affirmation for Ahimsa

I am enough, just as I am

I am gentle to all beings

I easily forgive myself and others

I am free of fear and anger

Journal Writing Exercises:

Write 3 ways you are loving to yourself.

Write 3 ways you are loving to yourself.

In what ways are you critical of yourself?

When have you not been kind to others?

How have you allowed others to be unkind to you?

Yoga Posture for Ahimsa might be Tadasana or Mountain Posture.

This is a posture of alignment and the basis for all yoga postures.

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The Eight Limbs of Raja Yoga

September 25, 2009

Compiled by Patanjali in the Yoga Sutras, the Eight Limbs are a progressive series of steps or disciplines which purify the body and mind, to enlightenment.

1. Yamas- Restraints
“Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”

The five Yamas are:

Ahimsa: nonviolence, non-harming

Satya: truthfulness

Asteya: nonstealing

Brahmacharya: Moderation

Aparigraha: Non-attachment, Non-possessiveness

2. Niyama– Observances
Self-discipline and spiritual observances.

The five Niyamas are:

Saucha: cleanliness, Purity

Santosa: contentment

Tapas: dicipline, austerity

Svadhyaya: study of the sacred scriptures and of one’s self

Isvara pranidhana: surrender to God, awareness of the divine

3. Asana– evolution of your personal practice
Asanas, the postures practiced in yoga.

View Asana Posts HERE

4. Pranayama– Breathing
Breath control

View Pranayama Posts HERE

5. Pratyahara– Drawing senses inward (prepares us for dharana)
Withdrawal or sensory transcendence, the conscious effort to draw our awareness away from the external world and outside stimuli.

6. Dharana– concentration (prepares us for Dhyana)
dealing with the distractions of the mind itself.

7. Dhyana- Meditation or contemplation (leads to Samadhi)
The uninterrupted flow of concentration.

View Meditation Posts HERE

8. Samadhi– Superconsciousness
One with everything

See all the 8 Limbs of Yoga Posts HERE

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